Meet Our Providers

With providers practicing in 50 specialties at 13 convenient locations, it’s easy to find the right healthcare team at Carle.

Use the following buttons to search by the category of your choice.

Medical Services

Carle Foundation Hospital

Based in Urbana, Ill., the Carle Foundation Hospital is a 413-bed regional care hospital that has achieved Magnet® designation. It is the area's only Level 1 Trauma Center.

611 W. Park Street, Urbana, IL 61802   |   (217) 383-3311

Carle Hoopeston Regional Health Center

Carle Hoopeston Regional Health Center is comprised of a 24-bed critical access hospital and medical clinic based in Hoopeston, Illinois.

701 E. Orange Street, Hoopeston, IL 60942   |   (217) 283-5531

Carle Richland Memorial Hospital

Located in Olney, Ill., Carle Richland Memorial Hospital is a 134-bed hospital with nearly 600 employees serving portions of eight counties in southeastern Illinois.

800 East Locust St, Olney, IL 62459   |   (618) 395-2131

Convenient Care vs. ED

Carle Convenient Care offers same-day treatment for minor illnesses and injuries through walk-in appointments.

Not sure where to go? Click here for a list of conditions appropriate for the emergency department

Philanthropy

Philanthropy gives hope to patients and helps take health care in our community to a whole new level.

Classes & Events

Carle offers free community events open to members of the public. Select a category to view the calendar of upcoming events.

Health Tips for Pregnancy

Thinking about having a baby? Start by looking at your lifestyle, habits and health risks. They can affect your pregnancy and later your baby. Here are six of the most important things you can do at least three months prior to conceiving:

  • Take 400 micrograms of folic acid daily to lower the risks of birth defects such as spina bifida, a condition where the baby's spine does not close completely during pregnancy.
  • Stop smoking and drinking alcohol. Smoking can narrow your blood vessels and affect the delivery of oxygen to your developing baby. And when you're pregnant, no amount of alcohol is considered "safe."
  • Get to a healthy weight and work with your doctor to control medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes and epilepsy.
  • Talk to your doctor about over-the-counter and prescription medications you may be using as well as any dietary and herbal supplements. Be sure your vaccinations are up to date.
  • Avoid contact with toxic substances and chemicals, including cat or rodent feces, which can lead to serious infection.
  • Don't neglect your teeth and gums. Good dental care, including daily flossing, can help avoid medical problems.

A father's health is also important to a successful pregnancy and healthy baby. Your partner should check with his own doctor about health history, medications he may be using and working toward a healthy lifestyle.